Not the Science Type

Female scientists challenge stereotypes and blaze paths for future generations in this 3M-produced docuseries

  • STEM education has an access issue: let’s change that.

    Around the world, people believe the we need more people in STEM careers. Eighty-seven percent of people believe we need to do more to encourage and retain girls in STEM education. At the same time, barriers remain - 73% of people believe underrepresented minorities often lack equal access STEM education.  

    Not The Science Type gets to the heart of access and gender inequity in STEM education and STEM fields. This four-part docuseries features four female scientists who are challenging stereotypes and confronting gender, racial and age discrimination as they rise to prominence.

  • Not The Science Type highlights four brilliant minds, showcasing women who break down boundaries within their fields – biology, engineering and science and technology-based applications.

    While each woman has taken a different path to pursue scientific excellence, they are bound by the common experience of feeling excluded, or “not the type” in traditionally homogenous fields.


  • Not The Science Type

    It's time to leave STEM stereotypes in the past. The film breaks down outmoded notions about what a scientist looks like or does in order to inspire the next generation of STEM leaders.

  • Gitanjali Rao: a 15-year-old inventor, America’s Top Young Scientist 2017 and TIME’s Kid of the Year 2020

    Gitanjali Rao, a 15-year-old inventor, America’s Top Young Scientist 2017 and TIME’s Kid of the Year 2020, striving to show girls her age what scientist can look like.

  • Dr. Ciara Sivels: nuclear engineer

    Dr. Ciara Sivels, a nuclear engineer, elementary school math mentor and almost-pastry-chef became the first African American woman to earn a PhD from University of Michigan in nuclear engineering.

  • Dr. Jessica Taaffe: a microbiologist

    Dr. Jessica Taaffe, a microbiologist who works with researchers and policymakers to interpret, communicate and apply scientific evidence to help solve global health challenges.

  • Dr. Jayshree Seth, a chemical engineer and 3M’s chief science advocate

    Dr. Jayshree Seth, a chemical engineer and 3M’s chief science advocate with 72 patents to her name who is inspired by those who work to make the world a better place.