Three critical steps for safety: Cleaning, testing and sterilization.

  • Cleaning: Follow manufacturer's recommendations.

    Manual cleaning is the first, very important step in endoscope reprocessing. Start with a thorough cleaning, using brushes if necessary. Ensure that every step is completed for every endoscope.

    Testing: Make sure endoscopes are clean and safe every time.

    Routine use of cleaning monitors that use detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from residual clinical soil is a small step that makes a big difference. Results provide immediate feedback on the efficacy of the manual cleaning. You’ll know right away if additional cleaning is needed before the endoscope moves to the next stage in the process.

    Sterilization: Beyond high-level disinfection: Low temperature sterilization for endoscopes

    For best practice on today’s most critical low temperature sterilization challenges, including flexible endoscopes, Ethylene Oxide sterilization stands the test of time. EO sterilizers are the only low temperature sterilizers available without lumen length or lumen diameter restrictions.5

    Sterilization: Eliminate dangerous bacteria with the most effective method.

    More than high-level disinfection, low-temperature sterilization ensures the safety of endoscopes for patient use.


Cleaning and Monitoring icons

3M Endoscope Cleaning Monitoring

Every Patient Deserves a Clean Endoscope
Every Patient Deserves a Clean and Sterile Endoscope

ATP cleaning monitoring and ethylene oxide sterilization

Flexible endoscopes: the most common cause of healthcare device-related outbreaks.¹

  • Because of their complicated construction, endoscopes can harbor matter that escapes the initial cleaning process and can prevent the sterilization or disinfection process from working properly. Visual checks are not enough, especially for the interior of long, narrow lumens. Residual matter can contain potentially deadly bacteria and pathogens that can be passed on to new patients.


Effective endoscope reprocessing is a strong defense against superbugs.

 

 

  • antibiotic-resistant bacteria graphic

    The dangers that antibiotic-resistant bacteria present — to patients, hospitals and facilities — are clear. And while efforts are being made to improve processes, clinical evidence tells us that current cleaning and cleaning-monitoring practices aren’t effective enough.2,3,4

    3M offers solutions that address the rising threat of superbugs by helping you make sure that every endoscope is safe for patient use, from cleaning monitoring verification to low-temperature sterilization.


Three critical steps for endoscope safety: cleaning, testing and sterilization.

  • Clean

    Cleaning: Follow manufacturer's recommendations.

    Manual cleaning reprocessing is a very important step in endoscope reprocessing. Start with a thorough cleaning, using brushes if necessary. Ensure that every step is completed for every endoscope.

  • Test

    Testing: Make sure endoscopes are clean and safe every time.

    Routine use of cleaning monitors that use detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from residual clinical soil is a small step that makes a big difference. Results provide immediate feedback on the efficacy of the manual cleaning. You'll know right away if additional cleaning is needed before the endoscope moves to the next stage in the process.

  • Sterilize

    Sterilization: Eliminate dangerous bacteria with the most effective method.

    More than high-level disinfection, low-temperature terminal sterilization ensures the safety of endoscopes for patient use.

Learn more about the advantages of ATP testing.


  • 3M™ Clean-Trace™ ATP Cleaning Monitoring System is not intended to monitor sterility or provide an indication of sterility

    1.     Rutala WA, Weber DJ. In: Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC). Guideline for disinfection and sterilization in healthcare facilities, Vol 2012. Washington [DC]: Department of Health and Human Services; 2008.
    2.     Wendorf KA, Kay M, Baliga C, et al. Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography–Associated AmpC Escherichia coli Outbreak. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2015; 36: 634-642.
    3.     Epstein L, Hunter JC, Arwady MA, et al. New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Carbapenem-Resistant Escherichia coli Associated with Exposure to Duodenoscopes. JAMA. 2014; 312: 1447-1455.
    4.     Ofstead CL, Wetzler HP, Doyle EM, et al. Persistent contamination on colonoscopes and gastroscopes detected by biologic cultures and rapid indicators despite reprocessing performed in accordance with guidelines. Am J Infect Control. 2015; 43: 794-801.  
     


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Need to talk to a 3M device reprocessing representative?

Whether you’re interested in a product, education, or training, our 3M device reprocessing representatives are here to help. If you’re looking for live technical support, please call the Tech Help Line at 1-800-441-1922 option 2.

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