rG-57-Columns-DefaultContent
Image of a nurse instructing a patient on how to use the Snap Therapy System.
Single-use negative pressure wound therapy

Help put your patients on the path to healing and maintain their quality of life during their wound healing journey.

EVALUATE 3M™ SNAP™ THERAPY SYSTEM TODAY

Snap Therapy System

The Snap Therapy System is a disposable negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) system that combines the simplicity of advanced wound dressings with the proven benefits of NPWT in a discreet design. This customizable system can help your patients return to normal activities and maintain their quality of life.¹ The Snap Therapy System allows for patient mobility¹ and managing various wound types, including difficult anatomies.

NOTE: Specific indications, contraindications, warnings, precautions, and safety information exist for these products and therapies. Please consult a clinician and product Instructions for Use prior to application. This material is intended for healthcare professionals. Rx only.

  • Photo showing Snap Therapy System applied to a patients foot

    Chronic wounds are a global challenge

    • $25 Billion is spent annually on treatment of chronic wounds.²

    • Among the multiple causes of chronic wounds is the prevalence of chronic diseases, which can have a direct impact on the body’s natural ability to heal. While cardiovascular and immunodeficiency conditions can slow wound repair, diabetes creates some of the most significant challenges to wound management.
       

      • Majority of venous leg ulcers not adequately treated with standard of care for the wound type³
      • Up to 24% of diabetic foot ulcers will eventually lead to a lower extremity amputation⁴
    • The Snap Therapy System is indicated for removal of small amounts of exudate from chronic, acute, traumatic, subacute and dehisced wounds, ulcers (such as diabetic, venous or pressure), surgically closed incisions, flaps and grafts.

Empowering positive outcomes with 3M single use, disposable NPWT products

  • half a clock face and half fraction icon on blue circular background
    Reduced time to closure

    Patients with lower extremity venous or diabetic ulcers were evaluated in a prospective observational and retrospective match controlled study. Patients using the Snap Therapy System with skin substitutes and skin grafts experienced a 50% absolute reduction in healing time versus modern dressing protocols including: Apligraf®, Rengranex®, and skin grafts.⁵

    Read full clinical evidence report (PDF, 300 KB)

  • hspeed gague icon on blue circular background
    10-minute application time with Snap Therapy¹

    Simple, cost-effective and convenient, the Snap Therapy System has an approximately 10-minute application time¹ and offers single-use, lightweight negative pressure wound therapy.

  • patient and clinician con on blue circular background
    Designed to meet the needs of clinicians and patients

    Simple to apply, it’s quiet, compact and easily worn under clothing.
    It helps maintain quality of life by minimizing interference with patients’ activity, sleep, showering and social interactions.¹

  • Satck of coins and piggy bank icon on blue circular background
    Fewer dressing changes can translate to reduced costs*

    Low-contact care reduces dressing changes in diabetic and lower extremity wounds to a minimum of twice a week, supporting clinician’s goals.⁶

    Learn how Snap Therapy has been shown to save over $9,000 per wound treated⁶ (PDF, 301 KB)

    *Outcomes were compared with 42 patient-matched controls treated at the same center with modern wound care protocols that included the use of Apligraf®, Regranex®, and skin grafting. 21 subjects completed treatment with the Snap Therapy System and with skin substitutes or skin grafts.

Disposable NPWT from the creators of 3M™ V.A.C.® Therapy

The Snap Therapy System includes dressings and accessories to help meet each patient’s unique needs for wound closure.

  • Snap cartridges
    Silent exudate management with a canister

    3M™ Snap™ Therapy System Cartridges

    Draws exudate away from the wound into the cartridge (60ml or 150ml options). A proprietary technology generates consistent, even levels of pressure and gels the exudate for improved containment and easy monitoring through the viewing window.
     

    • 3M™ Snap™ Therapy Cartridge
      Preserve patient quality of life with this small, lightweight and portable cartridge design. This cartridge holds 60ml and is available in three pressure settings: -125mmHg, -100mmHg and -75mmHg.
    • 3M™ Snap™ Plus -125mmHg Therapy Cartridge
      Preserve patient mobility with a disposable NPWT device that is discreet, quiet, compact and lightweight. This cartridge holds 150mL.

    NOTE: Specific indications, contraindications, warnings, precautions, and safety information exist for these products and therapies. Please consult a clinician and product instructions for use prior to application. This material is intended for healthcare professionals. Rx only.

  • Snap dressings
    Proprietary hydrocolloid dressing offers periwound protection and easy removal

    3M™ Snap™ Therapy System Dressing Kits

    Absorptive hydrocolloid properties help to maintain seal in the presence of exudate or sweat to help reduce periwound maceration.
     

    • 3M™ Snap™ Advanced Dressing Kit
      Address challenging anatomical wounds with customizable and flexible Hydrocolloid Advanced Wound Dressings in a variety of sizes.
    • 3M™ Snap™ Bridge Dressing Kit with SecurRing™ Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier
      Address difficult anatomical areas with flexible and customizable dressings that provide fast and easy sealing on uneven skin surfaces and challenging body contours. Kit includes 3M™ Snap™ SecurRing™ Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier to assist with fast and easy sealing on challenging body contours.
    • 3M™ Snap™ Bridge Dressing Kit
      Address difficult anatomical areas with flexible and customizable dressings that provide fast and easy sealing on uneven skin surfaces and challenging body contours. This kit does not include the 3M™ Snap™ SecurRing™ Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier, however, it can be ordered separately.
  • snap system accessories
    Simplify dressing applications and preserve patient mobility

    3M™ Snap™ Therapy System Accessories

Help patients get back to their lives

The Snap Therapy System combines the simplicity of advanced wound dressings with the proven benefits of negative pressure wound therapy in a discreet design. It’s fast to apply, and can be done in approximately 10 minutes so patients can quickly move on with their lives.¹

  • Enlarged image of all snap components on a patient leg
  • 1) Mechanically powered

    Proprietary spring mechanism generates consistent, even levels of pressure. No batteries and no lead wires to trip over.

    2) Collects

    Proprietary technology gels the exudate that collects in the cartridge, helping to contain and control potential contamination and odor. The visual display shows the amount of gelled fluid collected in the canister.

    3) Removes infectious material and exudate

    Exudate, infectious material and tissue debris are drawn away from the wound through the tubing into the canister.

    The Snap Therapy System draws exudate away from the wound into the cartridge, which uses a technology that turns the exudate into a gel to optimize containment.

    4) Sealed environment

    The dessing’s hydrocolloid properties help maintain a seal in the presence of exudate or sweat, offering periwound protection.¹

Manage a variety of chronic and traumatic wound conditions with Snap Therapy


The Snap Therapy System maintains patients’ quality of life.¹

Case Study Excerpt: Diabetic amputation wound

  • 3M™ Snap™ Therapy System case study

    A 62-year-old female underwent partial amputations of the 2nd and 3rd ray -osteomyelitis found in the OR- due to infected gangrenous toes resulting from her neuropathic diabetes and peripheral vascular disease.

    The wound bed at the wound care center had become necrotic with exposed bone and calcified vessels. She underwent debridement and dressing changes with Dakin’s Solution® (quarter strength). After one month (approx.) of traditional wound therapy, the infection was cleared but remained a large wound with exposed bone and minimal granulation tissue.

    The wound bed achieved full granulation and complete soft-tissue coverage of exposed bone as a result of 4 and 6 weeks of treatment with the Snap Therapy System with bi-weekly dressing changes (Figures B and C). The wound was then closed with an advanced cellular matrix. Wound closure was achieved ten weeks post-initiation of the Snap Therapy System (Figure D).

    Figure A: Wound at start of 3M™ Snap™ Therapy System.
    Figure B: Development of granulation tissue after 4 weeks of 3M™ Snap™ Therapy System.
    Figure C: Further granulation tissue development after 6 weeks of 3M™ Snap™ Therapy System.
    Figure D: Wound fully healed 11 weeks post presentation.

    Photos courtesy of Armstrong DEG, Marston WA, Reyzelman AM, Kirsner RS.

    As with any case study, the results and outcomes should not be interpreted as a guarantee or warranty of similar results. Individual results may vary depending on the patient’s circumstances and condition.

    Read the full case study to learn more (PDF, 1 MB)

  • 3M™ Snap™ Therapy System series of case studies

    Explore a wide collection of cases including lower and upper extremities and the torso and different wound types like post-surgical wounds, trauma wounds and chronical wounds:
     

    • Case 1: Manage a foot abscess
    • Case 2: Manage a calcaneal diabetic foot ulcer
    • Case 3: Manage a plantar diabetic foot ulcer
    • Case 4: Manage a post-surgical foot wound following partial first ray resection
    • Case 5: Management of a wound resulting from dorsal surgical dehiscence
    • ... and 14 more cases

    Read all 19 Snap Therapy case studies (PDF, 1.9 MB)

Woman looking out into a room

Hear what patients say about Snap Therapy

This video features a testimony from Christie Blom Duration: 2:08 min.

The Snap Therapy System has been shown to save over $9,000 per wound treated⁶

  • Bar graph comparing “Total cost of wound care” with a modern dressing average spend of $23,079, versus Snap Therapy System with $13,380 spend.

    In 2011, Hutton and Sheehan⁶ analyzed costs and effectiveness of three therapies for treatment of diabetic lower extremity wounds: modern wound dressings, powered NPWT, and non-powered Snap Therapy System. An economic model using peer-reviewed data was used to simulate outcomes for the different treatments.

    Based on the model, Hutton and Sheehan reported that, compared to modern dressings, Snap Therapy System saved over $9,000 per wound treated⁶ by avoiding longer treatment times and increased costs for complications, and healing more wounds than the modern dressings. Healing time was similar for NPWT and Snap Therapy System; however, Medicare and private payor costs were $2,300 and $2,800 less, respectively, for Snap Therapy System patients. The authors concluded that, in addition to cost savings, Snap Therapy System also allowed patients greater mobility.⁶

    Read full health economics report (PDF, 750 KB)

Application guides and resources for Snap Therapy

  • �� Text on screen: This video is intended for clinicians. The 3M"! Snap"! Therapy System is indicated for patients who would benefit from wound management via application of negative pressure, particularly as the device may promote wound healing through removal of excess exudate, infectious material and tissue debris. The Snap"! Therapy System is indicated for removal of small amounts of exudate from chronic, acute, traumatic, subacute and dehisced wounds, ulcers (such as diabetic, venous or pressure), surgically closed incisions, flaps and grafts. This video is intended for clinicians. Prior to use of the Snap"! Therapy System, consult detailed product instructions and important prescribing information contained in the Snap"! Therapy System Instructions for Use document. Additional safety information specific to the Snap"! Therapy System is available at the end of this video. Contact your local Snap"! Therapy System representative if you have any questions before initiating therapy. Snap"! Therapy System is contraindicated for: inadequately drained wounds, necrotic tissue such as eschar or adherent slough, exposed blood vessels, anastomotic sites, tendons or nerves, wounds containing malignancy, fistulas, untreated Osteomyelitis, actively bleeding wounds. j& Text on screen: 3M"! Snap"! Advanced Dressing Application. Images of the Snap"! Therapy System and Snap"! Advanced Dressing. j& The 3M"! Snap"! Therapy System is indicated for patients who would benefit from wound management via the application of negative pressure, particularly as the device may promote wound healing through the removal of small amounts of excess exudate from chronic, acute, traumatic, subacute, and dehisced wounds, ulcers, and surgically closed incisions, flaps, and grafts. A close-up cross-section artist rendering of the Snap"! Advanced Dressing at the wound bed surface with the system in place. The foam interface fills the wound. Therapy initiates and the dressing and foam appear compress into the wound. A 3D rendering of the 3M"! Snap"! Therapy Cartridge in action. When treating a chronic wound on the foot or ankle, it can be difficult to secure a dressing because of the uneven skin surfaces and challenging body contours. The Snap"! Therapy System is a good choice for delivering negative pressure wound therapy for low exudating wounds. Text on screen: Snap"! Therapy System Components. Images of the included components of the Snap"! Therapy System including the 3M"! Snap"! Therapy Cartridge, 3M"! Snap"! Therapy Strap, 3M"! Snap"! Advanced Dressing Kit which includes the Tube Fitting with one-way valve, Foam Interface, Hydrocolloid dressing with tubing, and the 3M"! Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier. j& The Snap"! Therapy System includes the 3M"! Snap"! Therapy Cartridge, 3M"! Snap"! Therapy Strap, 3M"! Snap"! Advanced Dressing Kit, and the 3M"! Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier. Text on screen: Wound preparation. j& Begin by preparing the wound bed and the periwound skin according to institution protocol, and irrigating the wound bed thoroughly with normal saline. A medical professional dressed in personal protective equipment stands beside a table in a hospital setting and treats a wound treatment practice mannequin with a venous leg ulcer. The medical professional prepares the wound bed and periwound skin according to institution protocol. They irrigate the wound bed using a syringe full of normal saline. The medical professional then dries the wound using a piece of sterile gauze. If necessary, apply a skin protectant to the surrounding skin. Text on screen: Foam sizing. j& Next, cut the foam interface to fit the size and shape of the wound. Using medical scissors, the medical professional cuts the foam interface to the necessary size for the venous leg ulcer. Text on screen: NOTE: Do not cut foam directly over wound bed to avoid loose fragments from falling into wound. Brush off foam edges after cutting to remove any loose fragments. Next, we will use the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier to make the dressing application faster and easier. Text on screen: Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier Application. Not made with natural rubber latex. An image in the center of the screen of the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier. It can be molded into uneven skin surfaces or challenging body contours, filling these voids and reducing potential leak paths. Prior to applying, make sure the skin is clean, dry, and free from any solvent or greasy substances. The medical professional uses sterile gauze and wipes around the wound bed to clean the intact periwound skin. Remove the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier from the packaging, and remove the release liner from both surfaces. Text on screen: Warm Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier in your hands. The medical professional removes the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier from the packaging and then holds it in their hands to warm it. Then, they remove the release liner from both surfaces of the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier. Gently mold, stretch, compress, or roll it to any shape to fit around the outside of the patient's wound. Text on screen: For smaller wounds, a portion of it can be used. The medical professional gently molds and forms the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier to the shape needed for around the venous leg ulcer. It may be pulled apart and rejoined to better fit around the patient's wound. Gently apply to intact skin around the outside of the wound with light pressure. The medical professional lays the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier around the venous leg ulcer and continues to gently mold and fit it around the wound, staying on intact periwound skin. NOTE: Do not place Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier directly into wound. Ensure there is at least one centimeter of intact skin between the wound border and the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier. The medical professional moves the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier to ensure that there is one centimeter of intact skin between the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier and the wound border. They run their finger around the perimeter of the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier to show the one centimeter of intact skin all the way around. They gently press down on the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier to seal it to the skin. j& Text on screen: Snap"! Advanced Dressing Application. j& Place the foam interface into the wound cavity. The foam interface should fill the wound cavity and extend above the wound margins. The medical professional places the cut foam interface into the wound cavity. The cut foam interface fills the cavity and extends above the wound margins. Text on screen: NOTE: Count and record the number of pieces used to ensure the same number of pieces are removed during dressing removal. If a piece of foam is used in a tunnel, ensure the foam is in contact with foam in the primary wound bed. Do not place foam into blind or unexplored tunnels. Place the Snap"! Therapy Dressing over the wound and seal. Ensure that the center opening of the port on the dressing is placed over the foam interface. The medical professional shows the Snap"! Advanced Dressing to the camera. They touch the center opening of the port with their finger, remove the backing adhesive layer, and gently guide the dressing down onto the wound, ensuring the center opening presses directly over the foam interface. j& Ensure that a minimum of one centimeter of intact skin around the wound is adhered to the dressing to maintain a proper seal. The medical professional gently presses down on the dressing to adhere it to the intact skin, smoothing out creases and wrinkles as they adhere it to the skin and removing further backing adhesive layers. Text on screen: NOTE: Ensure dressing seals completely over Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier. Do not allow Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier to extend beyond the edges of the dressing. Cut the dressing tubing to the desired length. The medical professional routes the dressing tubing up the practice mannequin's leg and away from the foot ulcer. They use medical scissors and cut the tubing to the desired length. Text on screen: NOTE: The cut should be straight, not at an angle. This will give a proper seal when connected to the tube fitting. Text on screen: Begin Therapy. j& Connect the Snap"! Therapy Cartridge to the tube fitting using both hands. The medical professional holds the Snap"! Therapy Cartridge toward the camera with one hand. With the other hand, they pick up the tube fitting and connect it to the cartridge. It clicks into place. Text on screen: CAUTION: Do NOT remove the cap at the end of the tube fitting. (click) Fully insert the tube fitting into the tubing. The medical professional holds the Snap"! Therapy Cartridge toward the camera with one hand. With the other hand, they pick up the tube fitting and connect it to the cartridge. It clicks into place. The medical professional grasps the tubing in one hand and inserts the tube fitting into the tubing. Text on screen: CAUTION: Do NOT remove the cap at the end of the tube fitting. j& To activate the Snap"! Therapy Cartridge, press down on the activation reset key and pull it out. Reinsert and repeat as needed until an airtight seal is obtained and the red pressure discharge indicator is not visible in the pressure discharge window. The medical professional presses down on the Activation Reset Key with their palm and pulls it out of the cartridge. They continue to reinsert and repeat the process until an airtight seal is obtained. The red pressure discharge indicator disappears from the pressure discharge window. The medical professional then removes the Activation Key from the cartridge. Text on screen: Keep the activation/reset key for future use. To enable greater patient mobility, secure the Snap"! Therapy Cartridge to the patient's extremity or belt using the Snap"! Therapy Strap. The medical professional picks up the Snap"! Therapy Strap and shows it to the camera. Text on screen: NOTE: When the strap is placed around an extremity, take care to ensure that the strap is not placed too tightly as this may cause discomfort or potentially decrease blood flow to the extremity. Distal perfusion may be assessed by noting skin color, altered sensation or pulses. j& Check negative pressure operation. The medical professional releases the velcro on the strap to extend it for use on the practice mannequin's leg. They wrap the strap around the mannequin's leg at the calf and secure it in place with the velcro ends of the straps. Then, they place the cartridge into a holster on the strap and click it securely into place. The dressing appears "sucked down." Text on screen: Snap"! Therapy System is a closed system so all the air must be removed. The therapy cartridge may need to be reset and re-activated several times to remove excess air from the dressing. The therapy cartridge may also need to be replaced if it no longer has negative pressure delivery capacity. The Snap"! Therapy System is working properly if the green capacity indicator is both visible and stationary in the chamber window, the dressing has a sucked-down appearance, and the dressing feels hard to the touch. At a minimum, the Snap"! Therapy Cartridge should be inspected once every eight hours. It is recommended that the dressing be changed at least two times per week, with frequency adjusted by the clinician as appropriate. Text on screen: Regular visual inspection of the Snap"! Therapy System is recommended so that any loss in negative pressure delivery can be recognized in a timely manner. Refer to the Snap"! Therapy System Instructions for Use for complete details on resetting, reactivating, replacing, cleaning, and troubleshooting the Snap"! Therapy Cartridge. For more product demos and application techniques, visit 3M.com/medical. 3M"! logo. Science. Applied to Life. Text on screen: Instructions for Use and Safety Information: As with any device, it is important to read and understand the detailed instructions for use and safety information. If you have product questions, please contact your local representative or visit www.3M.com/medical. NOTE: Specific indications, contraindications, warnings, precautions and safety information exist for these products and therapies. Please consult a clinician and product instructions for use prior to application. This material is intended for healthcare professionals. Rx only. � 2021 3M"!. All rights reserved. 3M"! and the other marks shown are marks and/or registered marks. Unauthorized use prohibited. Used under license in Canada. PRA-PM-ALL-00548 (07/21). KCI part of 3M"!.

    3M™ Snap™ Therapy System Application & Mechanism of Action Video
    Snap Therapy System Application and Mechanism of Action Video

    This video demonstrates the mechanism of action for Snap Therapy.

    Video 4:21 min

  • 3M™ Snap™ Bridge Dressing Application Video
    Snap Bridge Dressing Application Video

    This video demonstrates the application of the Snap Bridge Dressing.

    Video 5:22 min

  • �� Text on screen: This video is intended for clinicians. The 3M"! Snap"! Therapy System is indicated for patients who would benefit from wound management via application of negative pressure, particularly as the device may promote wound healing through removal of excess exudate, infectious material and tissue debris. The Snap"! Therapy System is indicated for removal of small amounts of exudate from chronic, acute, traumatic, subacute and dehisced wounds, ulcers (such as diabetic, venous or pressure), surgically closed incisions, flaps and grafts. This video is intended for clinicians. Prior to use of the Snap"! Therapy System, consult detailed product instructions and important prescribing information contained in the Snap"! Therapy System Instructions for Use document. Additional safety information specific to the Snap"! Therapy System is available at the end of this video. Contact your local Snap"! Therapy System representative if you have any questions before initiating therapy. Snap"! Therapy System is contraindicated for: inadequately drained wounds, necrotic tissue such as eschar or adherent slough, exposed blood vessels, anastomotic sites, tendons or nerves, wounds containing malignancy, fistulas, untreated Osteomyelitis, actively bleeding wounds. j& Text on screen: 3M"! Snap"! Advanced Dressing Application. Images of the Snap"! Therapy System and Snap"! Advanced Dressing. j& The 3M"! Snap"! Therapy System is indicated for patients who would benefit from wound management via the application of negative pressure, particularly as the device may promote wound healing through the removal of small amounts of excess exudate from chronic, acute, traumatic, subacute, and dehisced wounds, ulcers, and surgically closed incisions, flaps, and grafts. A close-up cross-section artist rendering of the Snap"! Advanced Dressing at the wound bed surface with the system in place. The foam interface fills the wound. Therapy initiates and the dressing and foam appear compress into the wound. A 3D rendering of the 3M"! Snap"! Therapy Cartridge in action. When treating a chronic wound on the foot or ankle, it can be difficult to secure a dressing because of the uneven skin surfaces and challenging body contours. The Snap"! Therapy System is a good choice for delivering negative pressure wound therapy for low exudating wounds. Text on screen: Snap"! Therapy System Components. Images of the included components of the Snap"! Therapy System including the 3M"! Snap"! Therapy Cartridge, 3M"! Snap"! Therapy Strap, 3M"! Snap"! Advanced Dressing Kit which includes the Tube Fitting with one-way valve, Foam Interface, Hydrocolloid dressing with tubing, and the 3M"! Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier. j& The Snap"! Therapy System includes the 3M"! Snap"! Therapy Cartridge, 3M"! Snap"! Therapy Strap, 3M"! Snap"! Advanced Dressing Kit, and the 3M"! Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier. Text on screen: Wound preparation. j& Begin by preparing the wound bed and the periwound skin according to institution protocol, and irrigating the wound bed thoroughly with normal saline. A medical professional dressed in personal protective equipment stands beside a table in a hospital setting and treats a wound treatment practice mannequin with a venous leg ulcer. The medical professional prepares the wound bed and periwound skin according to institution protocol. They irrigate the wound bed using a syringe full of normal saline. The medical professional then dries the wound using a piece of sterile gauze. If necessary, apply a skin protectant to the surrounding skin. Text on screen: Foam sizing. j& Next, cut the foam interface to fit the size and shape of the wound. Using medical scissors, the medical professional cuts the foam interface to the necessary size for the venous leg ulcer. Text on screen: NOTE: Do not cut foam directly over wound bed to avoid loose fragments from falling into wound. Brush off foam edges after cutting to remove any loose fragments. Next, we will use the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier to make the dressing application faster and easier. Text on screen: Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier Application. Not made with natural rubber latex. An image in the center of the screen of the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier. It can be molded into uneven skin surfaces or challenging body contours, filling these voids and reducing potential leak paths. Prior to applying, make sure the skin is clean, dry, and free from any solvent or greasy substances. The medical professional uses sterile gauze and wipes around the wound bed to clean the intact periwound skin. Remove the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier from the packaging, and remove the release liner from both surfaces. Text on screen: Warm Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier in your hands. The medical professional removes the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier from the packaging and then holds it in their hands to warm it. Then, they remove the release liner from both surfaces of the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier. Gently mold, stretch, compress, or roll it to any shape to fit around the outside of the patient's wound. Text on screen: For smaller wounds, a portion of it can be used. The medical professional gently molds and forms the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier to the shape needed for around the venous leg ulcer. It may be pulled apart and rejoined to better fit around the patient's wound. Gently apply to intact skin around the outside of the wound with light pressure. The medical professional lays the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier around the venous leg ulcer and continues to gently mold and fit it around the wound, staying on intact periwound skin. NOTE: Do not place Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier directly into wound. Ensure there is at least one centimeter of intact skin between the wound border and the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier. The medical professional moves the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier to ensure that there is one centimeter of intact skin between the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier and the wound border. They run their finger around the perimeter of the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier to show the one centimeter of intact skin all the way around. They gently press down on the Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier to seal it to the skin. j& Text on screen: Snap"! Advanced Dressing Application. j& Place the foam interface into the wound cavity. The foam interface should fill the wound cavity and extend above the wound margins. The medical professional places the cut foam interface into the wound cavity. The cut foam interface fills the cavity and extends above the wound margins. Text on screen: NOTE: Count and record the number of pieces used to ensure the same number of pieces are removed during dressing removal. If a piece of foam is used in a tunnel, ensure the foam is in contact with foam in the primary wound bed. Do not place foam into blind or unexplored tunnels. Place the Snap"! Therapy Dressing over the wound and seal. Ensure that the center opening of the port on the dressing is placed over the foam interface. The medical professional shows the Snap"! Advanced Dressing to the camera. They touch the center opening of the port with their finger, remove the backing adhesive layer, and gently guide the dressing down onto the wound, ensuring the center opening presses directly over the foam interface. j& Ensure that a minimum of one centimeter of intact skin around the wound is adhered to the dressing to maintain a proper seal. The medical professional gently presses down on the dressing to adhere it to the intact skin, smoothing out creases and wrinkles as they adhere it to the skin and removing further backing adhesive layers. Text on screen: NOTE: Ensure dressing seals completely over Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier. Do not allow Snap"! SecurRing"! Hydrocolloid Skin Barrier to extend beyond the edges of the dressing. Cut the dressing tubing to the desired length. The medical professional routes the dressing tubing up the practice mannequin's leg and away from the foot ulcer. They use medical scissors and cut the tubing to the desired length. Text on screen: NOTE: The cut should be straight, not at an angle. This will give a proper seal when connected to the tube fitting. Text on screen: Begin Therapy. j& Connect the Snap"! Therapy Cartridge to the tube fitting using both hands. The medical professional holds the Snap"! Therapy Cartridge toward the camera with one hand. With the other hand, they pick up the tube fitting and connect it to the cartridge. It clicks into place. Text on screen: CAUTION: Do NOT remove the cap at the end of the tube fitting. (click) Fully insert the tube fitting into the tubing. The medical professional holds the Snap"! Therapy Cartridge toward the camera with one hand. With the other hand, they pick up the tube fitting and connect it to the cartridge. It clicks into place. The medical professional grasps the tubing in one hand and inserts the tube fitting into the tubing. Text on screen: CAUTION: Do NOT remove the cap at the end of the tube fitting. j& To activate the Snap"! Therapy Cartridge, press down on the activation reset key and pull it out. Reinsert and repeat as needed until an airtight seal is obtained and the red pressure discharge indicator is not visible in the pressure discharge window. The medical professional presses down on the Activation Reset Key with their palm and pulls it out of the cartridge. They continue to reinsert and repeat the process until an airtight seal is obtained. The red pressure discharge indicator disappears from the pressure discharge window. The medical professional then removes the Activation Key from the cartridge. Text on screen: Keep the activation/reset key for future use. To enable greater patient mobility, secure the Snap"! Therapy Cartridge to the patient's extremity or belt using the Snap"! Therapy Strap. The medical professional picks up the Snap"! Therapy Strap and shows it to the camera. Text on screen: NOTE: When the strap is placed around an extremity, take care to ensure that the strap is not placed too tightly as this may cause discomfort or potentially decrease blood flow to the extremity. Distal perfusion may be assessed by noting skin color, altered sensation or pulses. j& Check negative pressure operation. The medical professional releases the velcro on the strap to extend it for use on the practice mannequin's leg. They wrap the strap around the mannequin's leg at the calf and secure it in place with the velcro ends of the straps. Then, they place the cartridge into a holster on the strap and click it securely into place. The dressing appears "sucked down." Text on screen: Snap"! Therapy System is a closed system so all the air must be removed. The therapy cartridge may need to be reset and re-activated several times to remove excess air from the dressing. The therapy cartridge may also need to be replaced if it no longer has negative pressure delivery capacity. The Snap"! Therapy System is working properly if the green capacity indicator is both visible and stationary in the chamber window, the dressing has a sucked-down appearance, and the dressing feels hard to the touch. At a minimum, the Snap"! Therapy Cartridge should be inspected once every eight hours. It is recommended that the dressing be changed at least two times per week, with frequency adjusted by the clinician as appropriate. Text on screen: Regular visual inspection of the Snap"! Therapy System is recommended so that any loss in negative pressure delivery can be recognized in a timely manner. Refer to the Snap"! Therapy System Instructions for Use for complete details on resetting, reactivating, replacing, cleaning, and troubleshooting the Snap"! Therapy Cartridge. For more product demos and application techniques, visit 3M.com/medical. 3M"! logo. Science. Applied to Life. Text on screen: Instructions for Use and Safety Information: As with any device, it is important to read and understand the detailed instructions for use and safety information. If you have product questions, please contact your local representative or visit www.3M.com/medical. NOTE: Specific indications, contraindications, warnings, precautions and safety information exist for these products and therapies. Please consult a clinician and product instructions for use prior to application. This material is intended for healthcare professionals. Rx only. � 2021 3M"!. All rights reserved. 3M"! and the other marks shown are marks and/or registered marks. Unauthorized use prohibited. Used under license in Canada. PRA-PM-ALL-00548 (07/21). KCI part of 3M"!.

    3M™ Snap™ Advanced Dressing Application Video
    Snap Advanced Dressing Application Video

    This video demonstrates the application of the Snap Advanced Dressing.

    Video 4:21 min

  • (MUSIC) (DESCRIBED VIDEO) TEXT ON SCREEN : The 3M logo Science. Applied to Life. TEXT ON SCREEN : 3M Snap Therapy System Basic Application. (MUSIC) TEXT ON SCREEN : This video is intended for clinicians. The 3M Snap Therapy System is indicated for patients who would benefit from wound management via application of negative pressure particularly as the device may promote wound healing through removal of excess exudate infectious material and tissue debris. The Snap Therapy System is indicated for removal of small amounts of exudate from chronic, acute, traumatic, subacute and dehisced wounds, ulcers (such as diabetic venous or pressure), surgically closed incisions, flaps and grafts. This video is intended for clinicians. Prior to use of the Snap Therapy System consult detailed product instructions and important prescribing information contained in the Snap Therapy System Instructions for Use document. Additional safety information specific to the Snap Therapy System is available at the end of this video. Contact your local Snap Therapy System representative if you have any questions before initiating therapy. Snap Therapy System is contraindicated for: inadequately drained wounds, necriotic tissue such as eschar or adherent slough, exposed blood vessels, anastomotic sites, organs, tendons or nerves, wounds containing malignancy, fistulas, untreated osteomyelitis, actively bleeding wounds. (NARRATOR) Hello all. My name is Jim McSweeney. I’m National Manager for Disposable Negative Pressure, and I've been asked to show some tips and tricks on applications of Snap. So as you can see we have our set-up here. We have our demonstration leg and we'll be doing a lateral aspect wound about the size of a quarter. We have our 10 by 10 dressing to my left, which is still - it's been taken out of the sterile sterile packaging but it's still in the box. We also have our blue foam which comes with the 10 by 10 and you can see I’ve already taken the liberty to cut the foam to fit just from a time savings. And then on my right we have 125 millimeter cartridges as well as just our boxes with our bridge dressing and our 15 by 15 dressings. So we're just going to take that foam that I’ve pre-cut and put it into the wound. I’ve already taken the liberty to use my secure ring and break a piece off. You'll notice that i've rolled it out in a long snake-like manner just like when we were kids playing with Play-Doh. The reason I do this is two-fold. Number one - it warms up the hydrocolloid - it makes it stick better. But also for me makes it a lot easier to work. So now I am going to make sure that my foam is in the wound, and I am also going to put my hydrocolloid around the wound edge, leaving approximately one centimeter away from the actual wound edges. Now once my hydrocolloid is on the wound, what this does is it it decreases the seal area I need with my 10 by 10 dressing. And you'll see that in a moment. So now i'm going to take my 10 by 10 dressing that's in the box. I’m just going to remove it from the box. I’m going to leave the quick connect valve in the box and just put that off to my left for the time being. Now if you take a look at the 10 by 10 dressing, it comes with a two peel backing. The two peels are released by the blue pieces on the back so there's a longer one and a shorter one, but that will open up. We always want to take our wounds with Snap and work from the wound backwards. And what I mean by that is we want to focus in on the wound itself and then determine where the cartridge might be going. So generally this patient would wear their cartridge on their leg or up by their hip so I want to make sure the tubing is going in that direction. So what I’m going to do here is… this is a very small wound. I am going to peel my blue backing just past just past the port in the middle. You'll notice that the port is exposed and I have the hydrocolloid exposed. Now notice that I’m doing this without gloves. The reason I’m teaching this trick is that with gloves - and it will be a clean procedure and your wound centers almost anywhere Snap is applied - gloves will stick to this hydrocolloid. So if they get touched you're going to have a problem. So we want to hold on to the to the 10 by 10 dressing. We want to put a thumb over the port and push down onto the blue foam. And then what I want to do is I just want to warm up and seal the area of the hydrocolloid that is exposed and does not have backing on it. So you'll notice I’ll smooth up and down just on this one portion. I’ll push in and around the foam onto the secure ring with my fingers. And I’m just warming up and getting this set. Now you'll notice that I still have the backing on the rest of the 10 by 10 and as I slide this off I am going to smooth down as I go. So I’m just smoothing and peeling the dressing down as I go. Generally this takes a little bit longer but it will give you a much better seal because I’m warming it up. Now with the 10 by - the other side of the 10 by 10 you have a much smaller peeling that you need to take off, but we're going to do it the same way. So we're going to peel slowly. Warm the hydrocolloid. Smooth it down as we take this off. And as we pull it pull the backing off you'll notice I’m just going left to right, right to left and just getting it set. Now you'll notice that the hydrocolloid itself there's a couple of wrinkles. There's a couple of bumps, but they're all outside securely. So we do want to do a good job making sure that the secure ring and that the 10 by 10 dressing are intact, that they're meeting each other, and that we want to roll out as many bumps and seals as possible. Now by using my hands on a hydrocolloid it's going to warm up the hydrocolloid. It's going to help to warm the secure ring. It’s also going to feel good for the patient, but also it's going to make sure that this wound has a good strong seal. Now you will notice that there's one wrinkle, but this is outside the hydrocolloid so I’m not as worried about this when I go to get my seal. Now, I reach over and I take out my quick connect valve. A couple of things I want to point out to the quick connect valve. First thing is is that I am holding a quick connect valve in the middle. On top we have a rubber diaphragm. This is a sealed portion of our quick connect so you'll notice that this little cap looks very similar to a lot of things that we see with nurses with IVs and other things, and they're used to popping this off. We do not want to do that with Snap because we will not get a seal. So we want to make sure that this rubber diaphragm is in place. We also want to hold the cartridge by the middle. I’m sorry - the quick connect by the middle. This gives us not only a better handle but we don't want to get any of those quick connect releases, and I’ll come up to that in a second. I’m going to take my quick connect - I’m going to take my cut-to-fit tubing and I’m actually going to place it into the quick connect and get a good connection. Now you'll notice that I have not cut the tubing. I prefer not to cut the tubing til the very end and the reason is is that I can approximate where the patient wants to wear it once we get a seal. And also once we get a seal I know that if I take this car uh take the quick connector off and cut the tubing to fit and now I have a leak, it's probably with my my cut in the tubing and not in the sealing. So now I'm going to hold the quick connect. I am going to pick up my 125 millimeters mark cartridge and if you notice I’m holding the middle of the the uh quick connect. I’m going to push this in and you're going to listen for a click. I am now going to take my fingers and grab onto the release valve and take this out. Now, clinicians like to hold and and apply Snap by holding the quick releases and pushing it into the cartridge. I want you to get away from doing that. The reason is is that there is a potential that when you slide this in you'll notice you do not hear a click. And the reason is is that - a reason I want to get you away from this is there is a potential that by holding down on the sides of this and pla.. and and trying to seat it, that you could actually get a leak in and around this area and not know it. So you'll also have a much more difficult uh problem with trying to figure out where that leak lies if if it is up in the seating area. So I want you to get used to holding on to the quick connect in the middle, push in, listen for the snap - no pun intended. Once you hear that click, you're going to take a look at the cartridge. We're going to press down on the cartridge to release the negative pressure or apply the negative pressure. You're going to hear a little whistle. That's air being drawn out of the wound. And you'll notice that the cartridge comes up. Oftentimes depending on the depth of the wound and how big the wound is you may have to prime the cartridge a number of times to get the foam to remain flat. Now you'll notice so far so good we have the foam pulled down we're going to just push back down on the cartridge and we're going to let it back up. Now you'll notice it's still sucking down, but it seems to have that we have a little bit of a leak. So what we will do is we will come back to our hydrocolloid and we'll continue to work this wound edge and continue to smooth it out and make sure that we have all our bumps and areas of of the uh seal out of the way and that everything is good. And then we're just gonna push back down one more time. And that should do it. And we now have a Snap application. At this point in time, if your patient wants a shorter tubing you can absolutely disconnect this and cut the tubing and then reconnect. You'll just have to remember that you will have to re-prime. (DESCRIBED VIDEO) TEXT ON SCREEN: Instructions for use and Safety Information: As with any device, it is important to read and understand the detailed instructions for use and safety information applicable to the Snap Therapy System. If you have questions, please contact local representative or visit www.3M.com/medical Note: Specific indications, contraindications, warnings, precautions and safety information exist for these products and therapies. Please consult a clinician and product instructions for use prior to application RX only. Copyright 2021 3M All rights reserved. 3M and the other marks shown are marks and/or registered marks. Unauthorized use prohibited. Used under license in Canada. PRA-PM-US-02067 (07/21) (MUSIC) TEXT ON SCREEN: the 3M logo Science. Applied to Life.

    3M™ Snap™ Therapy System Detailed Application Video
    Snap Therapy System Detailed Application Video

    This video includes detailed application of the Snap Therapy System.

    Video 8:57 min

Image showing computer screen, stack of books, table light, cup and pen and paper

Helping you develop your skills

Discover online learning that's right for you and deepen your clinical expertise with training opportunities and educational resources available on the 3M℠ Health Care Academy.
3M webinars and archived events can help keep you up to date with the latest product guidelines and scientifically supported standards of care.

View courses

Dark blue to lighter blue background image

Ready to try Snap Therapy?

See how our combination of products and technology can help you manage wound care the smart way.

CONNECT WITH A REP

Explore additional 3M Negative Pressure Wound Therapies

  • 3M™ V.A.C.® Therapy has been shown to be a successful way to manage wounds for the past 25 years⁹. It can be used to reduce hospitalization time and the risk of complications⁹,¹⁰ which in turn helps facilitate patient transitions from inpatient to outpatient care settings.

    Learn more about V.A.C.® Therapy

  • Veraflo Therapy combines the benefits of NPWT with automated instillation and dwell of topical wound solution to provide simultaneous cleansing and granulation tissue formation.¹¹,¹²

    *Results have not been confirmed in human studies.

    Learn more about Veraflo Therapy

  • Prevena Incision Management System manages the environment of closed surgical incisions and removes fluid away from surgical incisions via the application of continuous negative pressure.

    Learn more about Prevena Therapy

  • AbThera Therapy System incorporates all the functional elements of an optimal temporary closure device to help protect abdominal contents from the external environment, allowing rapid access for re-entry, medial tension, and fluid removal.

    Learn more about AbThera Therapy

Advanced technology, support and education

  • 3M™ Express

    Easily initiate V.A.C.® Therapy and Veraflo™ Therapy orders, get prescriptions signed via electronic signature and track order authorization online, in a secure and HIPAA compliant environment.
     

    • Place and track orders for V.A.C.® Therapy rental units, supplies, and disposables
    • Request service, pick-ups, and discontinuation of therapy
    • Access inventory management reports for V.A.C.® Therapy
    • V.A.C.® Therapy orders are released on average 9.7 hours faster¹³ than non-electronic orders¹⁴
    • Access inventory management reports for the
      3M™ V.A.C.® Ready Care Program
    • Contact Support 1-800-275-4524 ext. 41858

    Enroll or log in to 3M Express

  • MyWoundHealing™ Mobile App for Patients

    Welcome to the next step in your healing journey. Use the MyWoundHealing™ Mobile App to help manage your V.A.C.® Therapy. We're here to support you when you need us most. Having a wound can be a challenging and scary experience, but your doctor feels that V.A.C.® Therapy is an appropriate way to manage your wound. This site was developed to help you better understand V.A.C.® Therapy and provide you with best use practices once the therapy is prescribed by your doctor.

    Key Features of MyWoundHealing:

    • Track your progress of the wound
    • Get help with your device regarding alarms, alerts, troubleshooting support
    • Easily reorder supplies    
    • Education on V.A.C.® Therapy 

    Learn more about MyWoundHealing™ App
    Download MyWoundHealing™ App

     

  • iOn Progress™ Remote Therapy Monitoring System for Prescribers

    We wrap your patient in support, striving to make this short moment in their recovery journey the least intrusive as possible. We do this, as allowed by their benefit plan, by giving them on-demand access to a team of  Virtual Therapy Specialists. This team is extensively trained in high risk patient communication and provides your patient another resource during their NPWT journey.

    This way, you can focus on what you need to get the wound healed and we can help them overcome the daily hurdles NPWT patients experience.

    In doing so, together we hope to reduce out of pocket expenses for patients and shorten their time on NPWT.

    81% of patients use therapy >16 hours after an adherence call.20

    Learn more about 3M iOn Progress™ Remote Therapy Monitoring System

     

  • Technical Support

    Call 1-800-275-4524, x3 for questions and assistance troubleshooting our therapy units.

    Call 1-800-275-4524, x3 for questions and assistance troubleshooting our therapy units.

Looking for more information?

  • 3M is committed to providing customer service, including product reimbursement education and resources, to clinical providers and healthcare facilities that use qualified 3M products.

  • We are here to help! Get in touch with our customer support team for advice about our products and how to use them.

  • View our advanced wounds and NPWT portfolios and browse our product catalog.

  • Find Instructions for Use to easily access documents for specific 3M Health Care products.


References

1. Armstrong DG, Marston WA, Reyzelman AM, Kirsner RS. Comparative effectiveness of mechanically and electrically powered negative pressure wound therapy devices: a multicenter randomised controlled trial. Wound Rep Reg 2012; 20(3):332-341.

2. Sen CK, Gordillo GM, Roy S, et al. Human skin wounds: a major and snowballing threat to public health and the economy. Wound Repair Regen. 2009;17(6):763–771.

3. Fife CE, Carter MJ, Walker D. Why is it so hard to do the right thing in wound care? Wound Repair Regen. 2010 Mar-Apr;18(2):154-8.

4. Pemayun T et al. Risk Factors for lower extremity amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulcers: a hospital-based case-control study.

5. Lerman B, Oldenbrook L, Eichstadt SL, Ryu J, Fong KD, Schubart PJ. Evaluation of chronic wound treatment with the SNAP™ Wound Care System versus modern dressing protocols. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 2010 Oct;126(4):1253-61.

6. Hutton DW, Sheehan P. Comparative effectiveness of the SNAP™ Wound Care System. Int Wound J 2011; 8: 196-205.

7. Marston WA et al. A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Treatment of Venous Leg Ulcers Using Mechanically Versus Electrically Powered Negative Pressure Wound Therapy. Advances in Wound Care 2015; 4(2): 75–82.

8. Blume PA, Walters J, Payne W, Ayala J, Lantis J. Comparison of negative pressure wound therapy using vacuum-assisted closure with advanced moist wound therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers: a multicenter randomized controlled trial. Diabetes Care. 2008;31:631-636.

9. Law A L Krebs B. Karnik B. Griffin L. Comparison of Healthcare Costs Associated With Patients Receiving Traditional Negative Pressure Wound Therapies in the Post Acute Setting. Cureus 12(11): e11790. DOI 10.7759/cureus.11790.

10. Page JC, Newsander B, Schwenke DC, Hansen M, Ferguson J. Retrospective analysis of negative pressure wound therapy in open foot wounds with significant soft tissue defects. Adv Skin Wound Care/ 2004;17(7):354-364.

11. Lessing C, Slack P, Hong KZ, Kilpadi D, McNulty A. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy With Controlled Saline Instillation (NPWTi): Dressing Properties and Granulation Response In Vivo. Wounds. 2011 Oct;23(10):309-19. PMID: 25881108.

12. Carroll C, Ingram S, Comparison of Topical Wound Solutions for Negative Pressure Wound Therapy with Instillation: Effect on Granulation in an Excisional Non-Infected Acute Porcine Wound Model, Poster Presentation at SAWC, Oct 2017.

13. Data pulled January 1, 2020-August 31, 2020

14. 3M.iOnHealingOrderstoRelease_Sept2020_InternalReport. 25SEP2020.

15. KCI. National iOn Progress RTM Dashboard. Cutameen/RTM_FINAL_TD4_Tables. [Dec 2016-Oct 2022]