1. The E-Car Revolution Has Arrived
  • The E-Car Revolution Has Arrived

    June 03, 2016
    By Kevin Hoffman/3M Storyteller
    Close up image of an electric car plugged in at a charging station

    The E-Car Revolution Has Arrived

    Analysts forecast that the number of electric vehicles on the road will surpass 10 million by the year 2020. That’s compared to 180,000 in 2012, according to the International Energy Agency. Both Europe and China are expected to be the fastest growing markets. The trend is driven in large part by a desire to cut down on pollution – globally, transportation accounts for about 15 percent of man-made carbon dioxide.

    “Large automobile manufacturers are working under extreme pressure to develop electronic mobility solutions,” says Michael Kopka, business development manager for 3M Electronic Material Solutions.

    The E-Car Revolution Has Arrived

    Analysts forecast that the number of electric vehicles on the road will surpass 10 million by the year 2020. That’s compared to 180,000 in 2012, according to the International Energy Agency. Both Europe and China are expected to be the fastest growing markets. The trend is driven in large part by a desire to cut down on pollution – globally, transportation accounts for about 15 percent of man-made carbon dioxide.

    “Large automobile manufacturers are working under extreme pressure to develop electronic mobility solutions,” says Michael Kopka, business development manager for 3M Electronic Material Solutions.

    The E-Car Revolution Has Arrived

    Analysts forecast that the number of electric vehicles on the road will surpass 10 million by the year 2020. That’s compared to 180,000 in 2012, according to the International Energy Agency. Both Europe and China are expected to be the fastest growing markets. The trend is driven in large part by a desire to cut down on pollution – globally, transportation accounts for about 15 percent of man-made carbon dioxide.

    “Large automobile manufacturers are working under extreme pressure to develop electronic mobility solutions,” says Michael Kopka, business development manager for 3M Electronic Material Solutions.

    Anode powder in a glass container

    No ordinary battery

    One of the biggest obstacles to widespread adoption of e-cars has been perception about their batteries. Manufacturers have been working to make them more affordable – the U.S. Department of Energy says electric battery costs have been cut in half in the past four years.

    But what about battery performance that limits their range? The average e-car gets anywhere from 40 to 150 miles on one charge. That’s great for getting groceries, but longer road trips could be a challenge.

    No ordinary battery

    One of the biggest obstacles to widespread adoption of e-cars has been perception about their batteries. Manufacturers have been working to make them more affordable – the U.S. Department of Energy says electric battery costs have been cut in half in the past four years.

    But what about battery performance that limits their range? The average e-car gets anywhere from 40 to 150 miles on one charge. That’s great for getting groceries, but longer road trips could be a challenge.

    No ordinary battery

    One of the biggest obstacles to widespread adoption of e-cars has been perception about their batteries. Manufacturers have been working to make them more affordable – the U.S. Department of Energy says electric battery costs have been cut in half in the past four years.

    But what about battery performance that limits their range? The average e-car gets anywhere from 40 to 150 miles on one charge. That’s great for getting groceries, but longer road trips could be a challenge.

    Closeup image of an electric car

     

    Now a new high-tech battery may offer a solution. 3M has been researching new battery technologies for more than 15 years and recently made a game-changing breakthrough. The new batteries use an innovative mixture that’s almost twice as dense as the materials used in conventional battery technology. That allows the new battery to increase power life by up to 40 percent. In Germany, 3M works in close cooperation with automotive manufacturers to apply the new technology to create more efficient electric cars.

     

    Now a new high-tech battery may offer a solution. 3M has been researching new battery technologies for more than 15 years and recently made a game-changing breakthrough. The new batteries use an innovative mixture that’s almost twice as dense as the materials used in conventional battery technology. That allows the new battery to increase power life by up to 40 percent. In Germany, 3M works in close cooperation with automotive manufacturers to apply the new technology to create more efficient electric cars.

     

    Now a new high-tech battery may offer a solution. 3M has been researching new battery technologies for more than 15 years and recently made a game-changing breakthrough. The new batteries use an innovative mixture that’s almost twice as dense as the materials used in conventional battery technology. That allows the new battery to increase power life by up to 40 percent. In Germany, 3M works in close cooperation with automotive manufacturers to apply the new technology to create more efficient electric cars.

    “This enables the significantly higher storage density, a relevant factor for battery manufacturers when it comes to developing the next generation of cells.”
    EGBERT FIGGEMEIER
    APPLICATION ENGINEER, 3M ELECTRONICS MATERIALS SOLUTIONS