1. Under Her Visor
  • Under Her Visor

    April 06, 2016
    By Kevin Hoffman/3M Storyteller
    Jennie Hallestam, Welding Instructor, wearing a Speedglas welding helmet

    Under Her Visor

    Jennie Hallestam was working in a Stockholm department store when she decided to trade in her professional attire and pursue a new line of work.

    “I really enjoyed my job as a store manager, and I liked the people and dressing up in ‘girlie’ clothes each day, but it wasn’t something I had planned as a career,” Jennie says. “Then one day I woke up and decided that I wanted to try something new. I wanted to be able to make things with my own hands.”

    Under Her Visor

    Jennie Hallestam was working in a Stockholm department store when she decided to trade in her professional attire and pursue a new line of work.

    “I really enjoyed my job as a store manager, and I liked the people and dressing up in ‘girlie’ clothes each day, but it wasn’t something I had planned as a career,” Jennie says. “Then one day I woke up and decided that I wanted to try something new. I wanted to be able to make things with my own hands.”

    Under Her Visor

    Jennie Hallestam was working in a Stockholm department store when she decided to trade in her professional attire and pursue a new line of work.

    “I really enjoyed my job as a store manager, and I liked the people and dressing up in ‘girlie’ clothes each day, but it wasn’t something I had planned as a career,” Jennie says. “Then one day I woke up and decided that I wanted to try something new. I wanted to be able to make things with my own hands.”

    Welding Instructor Jennie Hallestam teaches students

    Jennie is part of a small, but increasing, worldwide trend. The number of female welders in the U.S., for example, grew by 2 percent over the past decade, according to the U.S. Department of Labor Women’s Bureau.

    “Welding just felt like the right thing for me,” Jennie says.

    After earning her International Welder and International Welder Specialist diplomas, Jennie took a job in Stockholm as a welding instructor for high school students and immigrants from everywhere from Ghana to Syria. If at first they’re surprised by her gender, she quickly convinces them with her knowledge of personal protective equipment.

    Jennie is part of a small, but increasing, worldwide trend. The number of female welders in the U.S., for example, grew by 2 percent over the past decade, according to the U.S. Department of Labor Women’s Bureau.

    “Welding just felt like the right thing for me,” Jennie says.

    After earning her International Welder and International Welder Specialist diplomas, Jennie took a job in Stockholm as a welding instructor for high school students and immigrants from everywhere from Ghana to Syria. If at first they’re surprised by her gender, she quickly convinces them with her knowledge of personal protective equipment.

    Jennie is part of a small, but increasing, worldwide trend. The number of female welders in the U.S., for example, grew by 2 percent over the past decade, according to the U.S. Department of Labor Women’s Bureau.

    “Welding just felt like the right thing for me,” Jennie says.

    After earning her International Welder and International Welder Specialist diplomas, Jennie took a job in Stockholm as a welding instructor for high school students and immigrants from everywhere from Ghana to Syria. If at first they’re surprised by her gender, she quickly convinces them with her knowledge of personal protective equipment.

    Russell Bridges talks with a fellow volunteer at an event

    “When they realize that we take their safety seriously, they are very appreciative. We always wear gloves, safety clothes and helmets – and the first day is often a big adjustment for the new students.”

    JENNIE HELLESTAM
    WELDING TEACHER, STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN

    “When they realize that we take their safety seriously, they are very appreciative. We always wear gloves, safety clothes and helmets – and the first day is often a big adjustment for the new students.”

    JENNIE HELLESTAM
    WELDING TEACHER, STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN

    “When they realize that we take their safety seriously, they are very appreciative. We always wear gloves, safety clothes and helmets – and the first day is often a big adjustment for the new students.”

    JENNIE HELLESTAM
    WELDING TEACHER, STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN