1. Art That Entrances – Literally
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  • Art That Entrances – Literally

    June 19, 2015
    By Evelyn Padilla/3M Storyteller and Monica Hanson/Videographer
    Close-up of the 22-foot kaleidoscope, created by artist Philip Blackburn. Close-up of the 22-foot kaleidoscope, created by artist Philip Blackburn. Close-up of the 22-foot kaleidoscope, created by artist Philip Blackburn.

    Art That
    Entrances – Literally

    This 22-foot kaleidoscope, powered by the kiss of the wind, will send you into a trance – or so says its creator. Step inside and experience its mirrored interior and colorful reflections that emanate a mysterious vibe.

    Art That Entrances – Literally

    This 22-foot kaleidoscope, powered by the kiss of the wind, will send you into a trance – or so says its creator. Step inside and experience its mirrored interior and colorful reflections that emanate a mysterious vibe.

    Artist, Philip Blackburn, stands next to his 22-foot kaleidoscope sculpture. Artist, Philip Blackburn, stands next to his 22-foot kaleidoscope sculpture. Artist, Philip Blackburn, stands next to his 22-foot kaleidoscope sculpture.

     

    Philip Blackburn is an environmental sound artist from England who creates art integrated with music. His piece – the Scope at Beacon Bluff – is part of the neighborhood’s green energy revitalization project. The sustainable project is powered by the wind and uses materials salvaged from the former 3M headquarters, which happens to be where the art is located in St. Paul, Minnesota. The installation includes concrete bricks for the base of the support legs and a stainless steel bench made from a former 3M staircase railing.

     

    Philip Blackburn is an environmental sound artist from England who creates art integrated with music. His piece – the Scope at Beacon Bluff – is part of the neighborhood’s green energy revitalization project. The sustainable project is powered by the wind and uses materials salvaged from the former 3M headquarters, which happens to be where the art is located in St. Paul, Minnesota. The installation includes concrete bricks for the base of the support legs and a stainless steel bench made from a former 3M staircase railing.

    Artist, Philip Blackburn, holds up a piece of 3M Dichroic Film, a material he used in building a 22-foot kaleidoscope. Artist, Philip Blackburn, holds up a piece of 3M Dichroic Film, a material he used in building a 22-foot kaleidoscope. Artist, Philip Blackburn, holds up a piece of 3M Dichroic Film, a material he used in building a 22-foot kaleidoscope.

     

    The Scope’s colorful “fascinators” are designed to mimic the brilliant iridescent look of pigment-less butterfly wings. They are made with 3M Dichroic Glass Film, donated by 3M.

    On the panel below, watch the hypnotizing motion, as the artist explains how the kaleidoscope art installation came together.

     

    o The Scope’s colorful “fascinators” are designed to mimic the brilliant iridescent look of pigment-less butterfly wings. They are made with 3M Dichroic Glass Film, donated by 3M.

    On the panel below, watch the hypnotizing motion, as the artist explains how the kaleidoscope art installation came together.

    VISIT THE SCOPEDICHROIC GLASS FINISHES
    Video of a robot competing in a recycling contest during the FIRST Robotics competition in St. Louis

     

     

     

     

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